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BFI Classics Animation Collection BFI Classics Animation Collection

Four Animation BFI Classics for only £40 Four Animation BFI Classics for only £40

Price: £51.96

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Akira

Successful in both Japan and the West, Akira had a huge impact on the international growth in popularity of manga and anime. Closely analysing the film and its key themes, Colin O'Dell and Michelle Le Blanc assess its historical importance, its impact on the Western perception of anime, and its influence on science fiction cinema.

Spirited Away

Spirited Away, directed by the veteran anime film-maker Hayao Miyazaki, is Japan's most successful film, and one of the top-grossing 'foreign language' films ever released. Set in modern Japan, the film is a wildly imaginative fantasy, at once personal and universal. It tells the story of a listless little girl who stumbles into a magical world where gods relax in a palatial bathhouse, where there are giant babies and hard-working soot sprites, and where a train runs across the sea.

Andrew Osmond's insightful study describes how Miyazaki directed Spirited Away with a degree of creative control undreamt of in most popular cinema, using the film's delightful, freewheeling visual ideas to explore issues ranging from personal agency and responsibility to what Miyazaki sees as the lamentable state of modern Japan. Osmond unpacks the film's visual language, which many Western (and some Japanese) audiences find both beautiful and bewildering. He traces connections between Spirited Away and Miyazaki's prior body of work, arguing that Spirited Away uses the cartoon medium to create a compellingly immersive drawn world.

Toy Story

The first computer-generated animated feature film, Toy Story (1995) sustains a dynamic vitality that appeals to audiences of all ages. This lively study explores how its depiction of a glimmering commercial world both deconstructs and affirms modern popular culture and in doing so provides a distinctive alternative to the usual Disney formula.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

In 1937, when Walt Disney released Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the film became an immediate, international sensation. Years earlier, when Disney decided to produce Snow White, his first animated feature-length film, even he couldn't have imagined the hundreds of artists required, the cost involved, or the necessary technological innovations. But all of this effort resulted in a film experience like no other. Fans marvelled at the lush colour palette, the seemingly three-dimensional space, the operatic dependence on songs to tell the story, and the compelling characterisations.

Snow White appealed to low and highbrow alike, from the teenagers who invented 'The Dopey Dance' to many of the great museums of the US, which proudly collected celluloid images from the film. Disney's Technicolor cartoon bridged apparent gaps between city and town, between age groups, between classes. Critics celebrated it as an instant classic.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs now stands as one of the most important of all Hollywood films, and its influence on movies – by Orson Welles, Michael Powell, and many others – extends to the present day. Based on extensive research in materials from the period of the film's production and distribution, Eric Smoodin's study presents a careful history of the events that led up to Snow White, the trajectory of Disney's career that made this extraordinary project a logical next step, the reception of the film in the US and around the world, and its impact on so many aspects of contemporary culture.

Akira

Successful in both Japan and the West, Akira had a huge impact on the international growth in popularity of manga and anime. Closely analysing the film and its key themes, Colin O'Dell and Michelle Le Blanc assess its historical importance, its impact on the Western perception of anime, and its influence on science fiction cinema.

Spirited Away

Spirited Away, directed by the veteran anime film-maker Hayao Miyazaki, is Japan's most successful film, and one of the top-grossing 'foreign language' films ever released. Set in modern Japan, the film is a wildly imaginative fantasy, at once personal and universal. It tells the story of a listless little girl who stumbles into a magical world where gods relax in a palatial bathhouse, where there are giant babies and hard-working soot sprites, and where a train runs across the sea.

Andrew Osmond's insightful study describes how Miyazaki directed Spirited Away with a degree of creative control undreamt of in most popular cinema, using the film's delightful, freewheeling visual ideas to explore issues ranging from personal agency and responsibility to what Miyazaki sees as the lamentable state of modern Japan. Osmond unpacks the film's visual language, which many Western (and some Japanese) audiences find both beautiful and bewildering. He traces connections between Spirited Away and Miyazaki's prior body of work, arguing that Spirited Away uses the cartoon medium to create a compellingly immersive drawn world.

Toy Story

The first computer-generated animated feature film, Toy Story (1995) sustains a dynamic vitality that appeals to audiences of all ages. This lively study explores how its depiction of a glimmering commercial world both deconstructs and affirms modern popular culture and in doing so provides a distinctive alternative to the usual Disney formula.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

In 1937, when Walt Disney released Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the film became an immediate, international sensation. Years earlier, when Disney decided to produce Snow White, his first animated feature-length film, even he couldn't have imagined the hundreds of artists required, the cost involved, or the necessary technological innovations. But all of this effort resulted in a film experience like no other. Fans marvelled at the lush colour palette, the seemingly three-dimensional space, the operatic dependence on songs to tell the story, and the compelling characterisations.

Snow White appealed to low and highbrow alike, from the teenagers who invented 'The Dopey Dance' to many of the great museums of the US, which proudly collected celluloid images from the film. Disney's Technicolor cartoon bridged apparent gaps between city and town, between age groups, between classes. Critics celebrated it as an instant classic.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs now stands as one of the most important of all Hollywood films, and its influence on movies – by Orson Welles, Michael Powell, and many others – extends to the present day. Based on extensive research in materials from the period of the film's production and distribution, Eric Smoodin's study presents a careful history of the events that led up to Snow White, the trajectory of Disney's career that made this extraordinary project a logical next step, the reception of the film in the US and around the world, and its impact on so many aspects of contemporary culture.

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Additional Info

SKU animationclassics
Format Paperback

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