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Caravaggio: BFI Film Classic Caravaggio: BFI Film Classic

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Leo Bersani and Ulysse Dutoit explore Derek Jarman's profound, unsettling and astonishing reflection on sexuality and identity.

Leo Bersani and Ulysse Dutoit explore Derek Jarman's profound, unsettling and astonishing reflection on sexuality and identity.

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Caravaggio (1986) is probably the closest Derek Jarman came to a mainstream film. And yet the film is a uniquely complex and lucid treatment of Jarman's major concerns: violence, history, homosexuality, and the relation between film and painting. However, according to Leo Bersani and Ulysse Dutoit, Caravaggio is unlike Jarman's other work in avoiding a lover-boy sentimentalising of gay relationships and in making no neat distinction between the exercise and the suffering of violence.

Filmmaking involves a coercive power which, for Bersani and Dutoit, Jarman may, without admitting it to himself, have found deeply seductive. But in Caravaggio this power is renounced, and the result is Jarman's most profound, unsettling and astonishing reflection on sexuality and identity.

Caravaggio (1986) is probably the closest Derek Jarman came to a mainstream film. And yet the film is a uniquely complex and lucid treatment of Jarman's major concerns: violence, history, homosexuality, and the relation between film and painting. However, according to Leo Bersani and Ulysse Dutoit, Caravaggio is unlike Jarman's other work in avoiding a lover-boy sentimentalising of gay relationships and in making no neat distinction between the exercise and the suffering of violence.

Filmmaking involves a coercive power which, for Bersani and Dutoit, Jarman may, without admitting it to himself, have found deeply seductive. But in Caravaggio this power is renounced, and the result is Jarman's most profound, unsettling and astonishing reflection on sexuality and identity.

Additional Info

Additional Info

SKU 9780851707242
Author(s) Leo Bersani
Publisher(s) Palgrave Macmillan , BFI Publishing
Format Paperback
Original publication date 01/04/1999
Number of pages 96

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