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Filmosophy Filmosophy

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By Daniel Frampton By Daniel Frampton
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Filmosophy is a provocative new manifesto for a radically philosophical way of understanding cinema. It coalesces twentieth-century ideas of film as thought (from Hugo MUnsterberg to Gilles Deleuze) into a practical theory of "film-thinking," arguing that film style conveys poetic ideas through a constant dramatic "intent" about the characters, spaces, and events of film. Discussing contemporary filmmakers such as BEla Tarr and the Dardenne brothers, this timely contribution to the study of film and philosophy will provoke debate among audiences and filmmakers alike.

Reviews:

‘You hold in your hands an extremely daring book. Filmosophy 
does not present a philosophy of film, nor does it explore how film 
contributes material for philosophical interpretation. Rather, in a 
lucid and clear style, Daniel Frampton argues that film is philosophy; 
it is itself, aesthetically, philosophical expression – a medium for 
thinking – and an accompaniment to thought. In conceptualising 
film as an "organic intelligence", Frampton draws from the lessons of 
both Gilles Deleuze and Stanley Cavell to propose one of the most 
original film philosophies of the last thirty years.’ 
D. N. RODOWICK, HARVARD UNIVERSITY

‘Filmosophy is a provocative and significant intervention in the 
contemporary dialogue about the cinema as manifest philosophy, 
expressed in both thought and action. Frampton’s expansive 
rhetoric is refreshing, his film references eclectic and his prose 
a pleasure to read.’ 
VIVIAN SOBCHACK, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES

‘The link between philosophy and cinema is one of the most 
fertile areas of contemporary film studies. Filmosophy establishes 
a vocabulary and an original perspective for understanding that 
link. New cinematic forms require new ways of thinking; indeed, 
this book suggests that these forms are new ways of thinking. 
Powerfully and provocatively, Filmosophy revises what we thought 
we knew about cinema, and asks us to look again at what cinema 
might know about us.’ 
COLIN DAVIES, ROYAL HOLLOWAY, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

‘A thorough and detailed defense of the idea that cinema is itself 
a kind of mind – that film thinks in its own way, merging with the 
thought of the filmgoer. And although the general idea that movies 
and the mind share essential features has been around since cinema 
was invented, Frampton develops it with great erudition and care, 
leading us to experience film as it should be experienced – as a 
unique form of consciousness.’ 
COLIN McGINN, RUTGERS UNIVERSITY

‘Frampton’s striking thesis is that film should be understood as 
"minded" – that it expresses thoughts, intentions and emotions 
about the world it depicts. This position is elaborated in detail in 
Filmosophy, and presented with great originality and subtlety. As the 
author himself points out, his approach has a number of antecedents 
in the history of film theory, but such a position has never been 
defended with the theoretical power and the illustrative detail that 
is contained in this remarkable volume.’ 
GEORGE M. WILSON, UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

‘Filmosophy offers a sympathetic and persuasive argument in favour 
of a new engagement with film which sweeps aside the shibboleths 
of current film studies and returns the spectator to a position of 
empathetic involvement with the filmgoing experience, mapping 
out a poetic-philosophical approach so different from the prosaic 
aridity of much writing on film. There is no doubting the originality 
of Filmosophy, or the fact that it constitutes a major contribution to 
the philosophy of film.’ 
GEOFFREY NOWELL-SMITH, QUEEN MARY, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

‘Filmosophy, a sprightly treatment of the ways that cinema makes 
us think, tells us why cinephilia is deeply rooted in perception and 
reflection. When Frampton tells us "the thinking of a film should 
be seen as free and fluid" he brings his readers to the threshold of 
creative criticism. Every reader will appreciate the energy, force and 
breadth of the author’s appreciation of cinema.’ 
TOM CONLEY, HARVARD UNIVERSITY

Filmosophy is a decidedly continental approach to film- 
philosophising, drawing heavily on the writings of Deleuze, 
Heidegger and Nietzsche. Frampton seeks to transform 
audiences from passive viewers into active co-creators of the 
cinematic experience, while leveling a withering critique of the 
cognitivism that dominates Anglo-American philosophy of film. 
His neologisms are both witty and to the point, and his film 
readings are not to be missed.’ 
DAN SHAW, LOCK HAVEN UNIVERSITY

‘An ambitious attempt to outline a new way of thinking about 
cinema, Filmosophy also gives a sympathetic and often perceptive 
account of Deleuze’s position, seeking to justify his contention 
that film is a form of thought. Its publication will make a valuable 
contribution to the debate about the contemporary understanding 
of cinema.’ 
IAN CHRISTIE, BIRKBECK COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

‘Frampton’s concepts of "film-thinking" and the "filmind" strike me 
as brilliant, as timely (in response to contemporary cinema), and 
as evocative and explanatory. Gritty, impassioned and engaged, 
Filmosophy challenges its readers to think afresh their experience 
in the cinema.’ 
EMMA WILSON, CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY

About the Author: Daniel Frampton is a London-based writer and filmmaker and the founding editor of the online salon-journal, Film-Philosophy.com.

Filmosophy is a provocative new manifesto for a radically philosophical way of understanding cinema. It coalesces twentieth-century ideas of film as thought (from Hugo MUnsterberg to Gilles Deleuze) into a practical theory of "film-thinking," arguing that film style conveys poetic ideas through a constant dramatic "intent" about the characters, spaces, and events of film. Discussing contemporary filmmakers such as BEla Tarr and the Dardenne brothers, this timely contribution to the study of film and philosophy will provoke debate among audiences and filmmakers alike.

Reviews:

‘You hold in your hands an extremely daring book. Filmosophy 
does not present a philosophy of film, nor does it explore how film 
contributes material for philosophical interpretation. Rather, in a 
lucid and clear style, Daniel Frampton argues that film is philosophy; 
it is itself, aesthetically, philosophical expression – a medium for 
thinking – and an accompaniment to thought. In conceptualising 
film as an "organic intelligence", Frampton draws from the lessons of 
both Gilles Deleuze and Stanley Cavell to propose one of the most 
original film philosophies of the last thirty years.’ 
D. N. RODOWICK, HARVARD UNIVERSITY

‘Filmosophy is a provocative and significant intervention in the 
contemporary dialogue about the cinema as manifest philosophy, 
expressed in both thought and action. Frampton’s expansive 
rhetoric is refreshing, his film references eclectic and his prose 
a pleasure to read.’ 
VIVIAN SOBCHACK, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES

‘The link between philosophy and cinema is one of the most 
fertile areas of contemporary film studies. Filmosophy establishes 
a vocabulary and an original perspective for understanding that 
link. New cinematic forms require new ways of thinking; indeed, 
this book suggests that these forms are new ways of thinking. 
Powerfully and provocatively, Filmosophy revises what we thought 
we knew about cinema, and asks us to look again at what cinema 
might know about us.’ 
COLIN DAVIES, ROYAL HOLLOWAY, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

‘A thorough and detailed defense of the idea that cinema is itself 
a kind of mind – that film thinks in its own way, merging with the 
thought of the filmgoer. And although the general idea that movies 
and the mind share essential features has been around since cinema 
was invented, Frampton develops it with great erudition and care, 
leading us to experience film as it should be experienced – as a 
unique form of consciousness.’ 
COLIN McGINN, RUTGERS UNIVERSITY

‘Frampton’s striking thesis is that film should be understood as 
"minded" – that it expresses thoughts, intentions and emotions 
about the world it depicts. This position is elaborated in detail in 
Filmosophy, and presented with great originality and subtlety. As the 
author himself points out, his approach has a number of antecedents 
in the history of film theory, but such a position has never been 
defended with the theoretical power and the illustrative detail that 
is contained in this remarkable volume.’ 
GEORGE M. WILSON, UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

‘Filmosophy offers a sympathetic and persuasive argument in favour 
of a new engagement with film which sweeps aside the shibboleths 
of current film studies and returns the spectator to a position of 
empathetic involvement with the filmgoing experience, mapping 
out a poetic-philosophical approach so different from the prosaic 
aridity of much writing on film. There is no doubting the originality 
of Filmosophy, or the fact that it constitutes a major contribution to 
the philosophy of film.’ 
GEOFFREY NOWELL-SMITH, QUEEN MARY, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

‘Filmosophy, a sprightly treatment of the ways that cinema makes 
us think, tells us why cinephilia is deeply rooted in perception and 
reflection. When Frampton tells us "the thinking of a film should 
be seen as free and fluid" he brings his readers to the threshold of 
creative criticism. Every reader will appreciate the energy, force and 
breadth of the author’s appreciation of cinema.’ 
TOM CONLEY, HARVARD UNIVERSITY

Filmosophy is a decidedly continental approach to film- 
philosophising, drawing heavily on the writings of Deleuze, 
Heidegger and Nietzsche. Frampton seeks to transform 
audiences from passive viewers into active co-creators of the 
cinematic experience, while leveling a withering critique of the 
cognitivism that dominates Anglo-American philosophy of film. 
His neologisms are both witty and to the point, and his film 
readings are not to be missed.’ 
DAN SHAW, LOCK HAVEN UNIVERSITY

‘An ambitious attempt to outline a new way of thinking about 
cinema, Filmosophy also gives a sympathetic and often perceptive 
account of Deleuze’s position, seeking to justify his contention 
that film is a form of thought. Its publication will make a valuable 
contribution to the debate about the contemporary understanding 
of cinema.’ 
IAN CHRISTIE, BIRKBECK COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

‘Frampton’s concepts of "film-thinking" and the "filmind" strike me 
as brilliant, as timely (in response to contemporary cinema), and 
as evocative and explanatory. Gritty, impassioned and engaged, 
Filmosophy challenges its readers to think afresh their experience 
in the cinema.’ 
EMMA WILSON, CORPUS CHRISTI COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY

About the Author: Daniel Frampton is a London-based writer and filmmaker and the founding editor of the online salon-journal, Film-Philosophy.com.

Additional Info

Additional Info

SKU 9781904764847
Author(s) Frampton, Daniel
Publisher(s) Wallflower Press
Format Paperback
Original publication date 21 Aug 2006
Number of pages 256

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