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Sight & Sound October 2017 Sight & Sound October 2017

Stephen King’s dark mirrors: we explore the cinematic mythos of one of cinema’s most prolific and influential horror auteurs. Plus female desire at the movies – a critical rallying cry; Darren Aranofsky discusses his confounding Mother; Yance Ford dissects his wrenching and radical Strong Island; and Hanif Kureishi shines a positive light on Peter Sellers’ Indian characters. Stephen King’s dark mirrors: we explore the cinematic mythos of one of cinema’s most prolific and influential horror auteurs. Plus female desire at the movies – a critical rallying cry; Darren Aranofsky discusses his confounding Mother; Yance Ford dissects his wrenching and radical Strong Island; and Hanif Kureishi shines a positive light on Peter Sellers’ Indian characters.
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With the passing barely a month apart of George Romero and Tobe Hooper, Stephen King towers larger than ever over the terrain of horror cinema. As the BFI Southbank marks the writer’s 70th birthday with a season of his films, we comb the dizzying array of King’s screenplays and adaptations – from Carrie and The Shining to Children of the Corn, The Dead Zone, Stand By Me, The Shawshank Redemption, The Mist and this year’s Gerald’s Game – for the key to his influence on popular American culture. Roger Luckhurst considers the ways in which King’s art resonates with modern notions of trauma and resilience, while Kelli Weston overlays King’s stories on the classical archetypes of fairytale.

From horror to desire: can female writers learn to loosen their critical corsets and express their own sexual attraction – perhaps taking a lead from new currents in nonfiction literature? “While men and women both get pleasure from looking at beautiful film stars, women really have something to gain by fully expressing that pleasure,” argues Christina Newland. “Real life has enough of those limitations. Women should be given the room to be both analytical and effusive, to hungrily gaze and to contemplate what that hunger means.”

One of this year’s standout documentaries, winner of a Storytelling Grand Jury award at the Sundance Film Festival, Yance Ford’s Strong Island rakes over the traumas and clichés behind family-wrenching murder of the filmmaker’s brother 20 years ago, and the impunity for his killer. As Robert Greene explores how Ford’s “self-aware, penetrating and uniquely crafted documentary performance creates rare pathways for understanding,” Ford details how he designed the film to appeal on two frequencies, both as an affirmation to minority audiences familiar with the experience it articulates and as a provocation to complacent white liberals.

Plus Darren Aranofsky discusses his confounding Mother; Hanif Kureishi shines a positive light on Peter Sellers’ Indian characters; Mark Cousins on Jeanne Moreau; Maysaloun Hamoud on her In Between; American artist Kevin Jerome Everson; Josef von Sternberg’s first and last films on Blu-ray; vintage Indian silent drama Shiraz; golden-oldies film broadcaster Talking Pictures TV; the link between capitalism and slasher films; Insyriated, The Work, The Road to Mandalay and all this month’s releases; the Locarno Film Festival; and the ending of Mira Nair’s Salaam Bombay!

Read more here

With the passing barely a month apart of George Romero and Tobe Hooper, Stephen King towers larger than ever over the terrain of horror cinema. As the BFI Southbank marks the writer’s 70th birthday with a season of his films, we comb the dizzying array of King’s screenplays and adaptations – from Carrie and The Shining to Children of the Corn, The Dead Zone, Stand By Me, The Shawshank Redemption, The Mist and this year’s Gerald’s Game – for the key to his influence on popular American culture. Roger Luckhurst considers the ways in which King’s art resonates with modern notions of trauma and resilience, while Kelli Weston overlays King’s stories on the classical archetypes of fairytale.

From horror to desire: can female writers learn to loosen their critical corsets and express their own sexual attraction – perhaps taking a lead from new currents in nonfiction literature? “While men and women both get pleasure from looking at beautiful film stars, women really have something to gain by fully expressing that pleasure,” argues Christina Newland. “Real life has enough of those limitations. Women should be given the room to be both analytical and effusive, to hungrily gaze and to contemplate what that hunger means.”

One of this year’s standout documentaries, winner of a Storytelling Grand Jury award at the Sundance Film Festival, Yance Ford’s Strong Island rakes over the traumas and clichés behind family-wrenching murder of the filmmaker’s brother 20 years ago, and the impunity for his killer. As Robert Greene explores how Ford’s “self-aware, penetrating and uniquely crafted documentary performance creates rare pathways for understanding,” Ford details how he designed the film to appeal on two frequencies, both as an affirmation to minority audiences familiar with the experience it articulates and as a provocation to complacent white liberals.

Plus Darren Aranofsky discusses his confounding Mother; Hanif Kureishi shines a positive light on Peter Sellers’ Indian characters; Mark Cousins on Jeanne Moreau; Maysaloun Hamoud on her In Between; American artist Kevin Jerome Everson; Josef von Sternberg’s first and last films on Blu-ray; vintage Indian silent drama Shiraz; golden-oldies film broadcaster Talking Pictures TV; the link between capitalism and slasher films; Insyriated, The Work, The Road to Mandalay and all this month’s releases; the Locarno Film Festival; and the ending of Mira Nair’s Salaam Bombay!

Read more here

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