More Views

January 2016 Sight & Sound January 2016 Sight & Sound

The best films of 2015 as voted for by 168 critics and the year in review, Alejandro González Iñarritu on The Revenant and Nora Ephron, queen of the romcom. Plus Guy Maddin, Terence Davies, Raoul Peck, Haile Gerima, Cecile Emeke and much more… The best films of 2015 as voted for by 168 critics and the year in review, Alejandro González Iñarritu on The Revenant and Nora Ephron, queen of the romcom. Plus Guy Maddin, Terence Davies, Raoul Peck, Haile Gerima, Cecile Emeke and much more…
£4.50

Description

Details

Our first issue of the new year shows a grizzled Leonardo DiCaprio on a mission of revenge after being left for dead in the frozen north of Alejandro González Iñarritu’s The Revenant.

Edward Lawrenson talked to Iñarritu the day after the director had finished editing this Jack London-like tale of super-hardy fur trappers at odds with bears, native tribes and the elements, in which he and cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki again give the impression that the whole film was shot in a single take.

Of course, The Revenant has been seen by hardly anyone yet, and so it could not have been included in this year’s Films of the Year poll. Without giving anything away here, this year’s brilliantly diverse top ten contains a few surprises and many films which have a woman as their central character.

We were proud back at the London Film Festival in October to have Guy Maddin’s extraordinary cornucopia of twisted half-narratives and fractured nightmares The Forbidden Room as the Sight & Sound gala screening. Now, as it gets its UK release, Adam Nayman interviews Maddin and his newly promoted young co-director Evan Johnson about the film’s strangely alluring exegesis.

In concert with the BFI’s bonanza LOVE programme and the re-release of When Harry Met Sally, Hannah McGill is delighted to dub Nora Ephron the ‘Queen of the Romcom’ for her blending of the “sweet and sour flavours of screwball romance” and commitment to being simultaneously funny and truthful, no matter what the cost.

The great Terence Davies talks to Nick James about his 15-year struggle to bring Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s classic novel Sunset Song to the screen, something he’s achieved with such sumptuousness in 65mm that you feel the ground beneath your feet must be in the Mearns in north-east Scotland.

By coincidence more than design (we’re glad to say) we’re featuring three black directors this month. The redoubtable Ashley Clark surveys the career of Haiti’s activist auteur Raoul Peck, and visits Ethiopian-born US-resident Haile Gerima at his cafe in Washington DC (in our Wide Angle section). Meanwhile young UK online filmmaker Cecile Emeke talks to Simran Hans about her self-made innovative and provocative short films (see Rushes). Our first issue of the new year shows a grizzled Leonardo DiCaprio on a mission of revenge after being left for dead in the frozen north of Alejandro González Iñarritu’s The Revenant.

Edward Lawrenson talked to Iñarritu the day after the director had finished editing this Jack London-like tale of super-hardy fur trappers at odds with bears, native tribes and the elements, in which he and cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki again give the impression that the whole film was shot in a single take.

Of course, The Revenant has been seen by hardly anyone yet, and so it could not have been included in this year’s Films of the Year poll. Without giving anything away here, this year’s brilliantly diverse top ten contains a few surprises and many films which have a woman as their central character.

We were proud back at the London Film Festival in October to have Guy Maddin’s extraordinary cornucopia of twisted half-narratives and fractured nightmares The Forbidden Room as the Sight & Sound gala screening. Now, as it gets its UK release, Adam Nayman interviews Maddin and his newly promoted young co-director Evan Johnson about the film’s strangely alluring exegesis.

In concert with the BFI’s bonanza LOVE programme and the re-release of When Harry Met Sally, Hannah McGill is delighted to dub Nora Ephron the ‘Queen of the Romcom’ for her blending of the “sweet and sour flavours of screwball romance” and commitment to being simultaneously funny and truthful, no matter what the cost.

The great Terence Davies talks to Nick James about his 15-year struggle to bring Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s classic novel Sunset Song to the screen, something he’s achieved with such sumptuousness in 65mm that you feel the ground beneath your feet must be in the Mearns in north-east Scotland.

By coincidence more than design (we’re glad to say) we’re featuring three black directors this month. The redoubtable Ashley Clark surveys the career of Haiti’s activist auteur Raoul Peck, and visits Ethiopian-born US-resident Haile Gerima at his cafe in Washington DC (in our Wide Angle section). Meanwhile young UK online filmmaker Cecile Emeke talks to Simran Hans about her self-made innovative and provocative short films (see Rushes).

Additional Info

Additional Info

SKU SSJAN2016

Tags