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February 2014 Sight & Sound February 2014 Sight & Sound

Joel and Ethan Coen on folk music, success and Inside Llewyn Davis, plus Steve McQueen on 12 Years a Slave, Martin Scorsese’s American black farce The Wolf of Wall Street, Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye and the S&S Interview with George Romero. Joel and Ethan Coen on folk music, success and Inside Llewyn Davis, plus Steve McQueen on 12 Years a Slave, Martin Scorsese’s American black farce The Wolf of Wall Street, Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye and the S&S Interview with George Romero.
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Features

Inside the wheel

The folk-singing protagonist at the heart of the Greenwich Village scene in the early 1960s in Inside Llewyn Davis is trapped in a cycle of endless misfortune, trying to make a success of things against the odds. But then, as the Coen brothers suggest, isn’t that a bit like life? By Nick James.

A history of violence

Steve McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave observes with raw, unflinching brutality the true story of a free black man who is forced into slavery in America’s Deep South – a visceral and distressing portrait of racial abuse that underscores the director’s belief that “if you don’t see it visually, mentally, psychologically, physically, then there’s no picture”. By Jonathan Romney.

Street legal

Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye recasts Bogart’s wise-cracking, lip-curling hard-man Marlowe from The Big Sleep as a shabby, mumbling insomniac adrift on the mean streets of Los Angeles – one of the most memorable in a run of adaptations reconfiguring Chandler’s distinctive universe for the big screen. By Kim Newman.

Shooting the past

For half a century Raymond Depardon has been filming and photographing France and the wider world. His latest documentary, Journal de France, juxtaposes his unique archives with the travelogue of a contemporary camper van tour of his native land. By Kieron Corless.

Birth of a salesman

For all its apparent echoes of his previous work, Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street sees the director expand his range, experimenting with a new vein of social comedy that helps capture the American zeitgeist as strongly as ‘Goodfellas’ and ‘Casino’ – this time not as gangster noir but as black farce. By Ian Christie.

Revolution in design

Though Soviet art is often dismissed as dreary propagandist kitsch, in the 1920s Russian designers revolutionised the art of the film poster, embracing abstraction and surrealism, bringing new techniques and a dizzying dynamism to the form. By Isabel Stevens.

The Sight & Sound Interview: George A. Romero

The director’s 1968 low-budget indie classic Night of the Living Dead helped reinvent horror cinema for the modern era, setting the tone for the subversive apocalyptic visions that would define his work over the next 45 years. Here, the original king of the zombies recalls what got him started, how his style evolved, why he remains defiant and what he thinks of the new breed of pale-faced imitators. Interview by James Blackford.

Reviews

Films of the month

American Hustle Dallas Buyers Club The Invisible Woman Teenage

plus reviews of

After Tiller; Age of Uprising/Michael Kohlhaas; Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues; The Armstrong Lie; August: Osage County; The Best Man Holiday; Black Nativity; The Book Thief; Bullett Raja; Crystal Fairy & the Magical Cactus and 2012; Delivery Man; Getaway; The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug; Inside Llewyn Davis; Journal de France; Killing Oswald; Kiss the Water; Labor Day; Lone Survivor; Moon Man/Der Mondmann; Moshi Monsters: The Movie; Oldboy; Out of the Furnace; The Patrol; The Secret Life of Walter Mitty; 12 Years a Slave; The Wolf of Wall Street

Features

Inside the wheel

The folk-singing protagonist at the heart of the Greenwich Village scene in the early 1960s in Inside Llewyn Davis is trapped in a cycle of endless misfortune, trying to make a success of things against the odds. But then, as the Coen brothers suggest, isn’t that a bit like life? By Nick James.

A history of violence

Steve McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave observes with raw, unflinching brutality the true story of a free black man who is forced into slavery in America’s Deep South – a visceral and distressing portrait of racial abuse that underscores the director’s belief that “if you don’t see it visually, mentally, psychologically, physically, then there’s no picture”. By Jonathan Romney.

Street legal

Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye recasts Bogart’s wise-cracking, lip-curling hard-man Marlowe from The Big Sleep as a shabby, mumbling insomniac adrift on the mean streets of Los Angeles – one of the most memorable in a run of adaptations reconfiguring Chandler’s distinctive universe for the big screen. By Kim Newman.

Shooting the past

For half a century Raymond Depardon has been filming and photographing France and the wider world. His latest documentary, Journal de France, juxtaposes his unique archives with the travelogue of a contemporary camper van tour of his native land. By Kieron Corless.

Birth of a salesman

For all its apparent echoes of his previous work, Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street sees the director expand his range, experimenting with a new vein of social comedy that helps capture the American zeitgeist as strongly as ‘Goodfellas’ and ‘Casino’ – this time not as gangster noir but as black farce. By Ian Christie.

Revolution in design

Though Soviet art is often dismissed as dreary propagandist kitsch, in the 1920s Russian designers revolutionised the art of the film poster, embracing abstraction and surrealism, bringing new techniques and a dizzying dynamism to the form. By Isabel Stevens.

The Sight & Sound Interview: George A. Romero

The director’s 1968 low-budget indie classic Night of the Living Dead helped reinvent horror cinema for the modern era, setting the tone for the subversive apocalyptic visions that would define his work over the next 45 years. Here, the original king of the zombies recalls what got him started, how his style evolved, why he remains defiant and what he thinks of the new breed of pale-faced imitators. Interview by James Blackford.

Reviews

Films of the month

American Hustle Dallas Buyers Club The Invisible Woman Teenage

plus reviews of

After Tiller; Age of Uprising/Michael Kohlhaas; Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues; The Armstrong Lie; August: Osage County; The Best Man Holiday; Black Nativity; The Book Thief; Bullett Raja; Crystal Fairy & the Magical Cactus and 2012; Delivery Man; Getaway; The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug; Inside Llewyn Davis; Journal de France; Killing Oswald; Kiss the Water; Labor Day; Lone Survivor; Moon Man/Der Mondmann; Moshi Monsters: The Movie; Oldboy; Out of the Furnace; The Patrol; The Secret Life of Walter Mitty; 12 Years a Slave; The Wolf of Wall Street

Additional Info

Additional Info

SKU ssfeb2014

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