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January 2015 Sight & Sound January 2015 Sight & Sound

The Grandmaster: Wong Kar Wai returns with a martial-arts epic on the life of the legendary Ip Man. Plus Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Birdman and the resurrection of Michael Keaton, John Berger on Charlie Chaplin, the Marx Brothers, teapots – and our critics’ roundup of all the best movies of 2014.

The Grandmaster: Wong Kar Wai returns with a martial-arts epic on the life of the legendary Ip Man. Plus Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Birdman and the resurrection of Michael Keaton, John Berger on Charlie Chaplin, the Marx Brothers, teapots – and our critics’ roundup of all the best movies of 2014.

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Cover feature: The horizontal Wong Kar Wai

Wong Kar Wai’s respect for traditional martial arts is firmly in evidence in his vividly authenticThe Grandmaster, which explores the life of the legendary wing chun teacher Ip Man. But does his narrative lose its way in the battle between style and substance? By Tony Rayns.

Plus: In the mood for kung fu

Wong Kar Wai explains his lifelong fascination with martial arts, why he was determined to bring a new realism to the genre, and why quality films, like the finest stews, should never be made in a hurry. Interview by James Bell.

Plus: The birth of a legend

The Grandmaster sits in a tradition of kung fu movies showcasing genuine fighting techniques alongside the fictional exploits of real-life historical martial-arts masters like Ip Man
. By Leon Hunt.

Flight of fancy

Birdman, Alejandro González Iñárritu’s tale of an actor looking to get his career flying again years after walking out on a superhero franchise, sees the director jettisoning the weighty metaphysical issues of his previous work in favour of a welcome lightness of touch. By Paul Julian Smith.

Films of the year

Quality narrative cinema gets the usual thumbs-up in our 2014 poll, but some exceptional documentaries were arguably more important – while shifts within the industry, 
particularly in its relationship with television, should make for an intriguing 2015. By Nick James

Plus: The year in review

Lists and comment by 50 of our year-end poll contributors.

Some notes about the art of falling

In the century that has passed since The Tramp first strolled into the frame on cinema screens, the world has changed deeply. Yet Charlie Chaplin’s early films have lost none of their surprise or humour or bite or illumination, and their relevance now seems more urgent than ever. By John Berger.

 

Reviews

Films of the month

Enemy
The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1
Interstellar

plus reviews of

Algorithms
The Best of Me
Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
Black Sea
Bogowie
Bonobo
Bringing Tibet Home
The Circle
Diplomacy
Dumb and Dumber To
Eastern Boys
Electricity
The Face of Love
The Grandmaster
The Green Prince
Hello Carter
Horns
Horrible Bosses 2
The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness
Kon-Tiki
Manakamana
Mea Culpa
Me, Myself and Mum
Men, Women & Children
Merchants of Doubt
Nativity 3: Dude, Where’s My Donkey?!
Northern Soul
One Rogue Reporter
Open Bethlehem
Ouija
Redirected
School of Babel
St. Vincent
The Theory of Everything
We Are the Giant
The Woman in Black: Angel of Death

Features

Cover feature: The horizontal Wong Kar Wai

Wong Kar Wai’s respect for traditional martial arts is firmly in evidence in his vividly authenticThe Grandmaster, which explores the life of the legendary wing chun teacher Ip Man. But does his narrative lose its way in the battle between style and substance? By Tony Rayns.

Plus: In the mood for kung fu

Wong Kar Wai explains his lifelong fascination with martial arts, why he was determined to bring a new realism to the genre, and why quality films, like the finest stews, should never be made in a hurry. Interview by James Bell.

Plus: The birth of a legend

The Grandmaster sits in a tradition of kung fu movies showcasing genuine fighting techniques alongside the fictional exploits of real-life historical martial-arts masters like Ip Man
. By Leon Hunt.

Flight of fancy

Birdman, Alejandro González Iñárritu’s tale of an actor looking to get his career flying again years after walking out on a superhero franchise, sees the director jettisoning the weighty metaphysical issues of his previous work in favour of a welcome lightness of touch. By Paul Julian Smith.

Films of the year

Quality narrative cinema gets the usual thumbs-up in our 2014 poll, but some exceptional documentaries were arguably more important – while shifts within the industry, 
particularly in its relationship with television, should make for an intriguing 2015. By Nick James

Plus: The year in review

Lists and comment by 50 of our year-end poll contributors.

Some notes about the art of falling

In the century that has passed since The Tramp first strolled into the frame on cinema screens, the world has changed deeply. Yet Charlie Chaplin’s early films have lost none of their surprise or humour or bite or illumination, and their relevance now seems more urgent than ever. By John Berger.

 

Reviews

Films of the month

Enemy
The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1
Interstellar

plus reviews of

Algorithms
The Best of Me
Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
Black Sea
Bogowie
Bonobo
Bringing Tibet Home
The Circle
Diplomacy
Dumb and Dumber To
Eastern Boys
Electricity
The Face of Love
The Grandmaster
The Green Prince
Hello Carter
Horns
Horrible Bosses 2
The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness
Kon-Tiki
Manakamana
Mea Culpa
Me, Myself and Mum
Men, Women & Children
Merchants of Doubt
Nativity 3: Dude, Where’s My Donkey?!
Northern Soul
One Rogue Reporter
Open Bethlehem
Ouija
Redirected
School of Babel
St. Vincent
The Theory of Everything
We Are the Giant
The Woman in Black: Angel of Death

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