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August 2014 Sight & Sound August 2014 Sight & Sound

Richard Linklater on the 12 years of Boyhood, Steve McQueen, Penny Woolcock et al on 25 years of Do the Right Thing, three decades of action-blockbuster stars, 12 highlights of China’s ‘Fifth Generation’, a night at the cinema in 1914 – and David Thomson on left-handedness in cinema.

Richard Linklater on the 12 years of Boyhood, Steve McQueen, Penny Woolcock et al on 25 years of Do the Right Thing, three decades of action-blockbuster stars, 12 highlights of China’s ‘Fifth Generation’, a night at the cinema in 1914 – and David Thomson on left-handedness in cinema.

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Features

COVER FEATURE: The S&S Interview – Richard Linklater

The acclaimed director of the Before trilogy discusses the genesis and evolution of his self-proclaimed ‘indie epic’ Boyhood, which was filmed over 12 years in order to capture the growing pains of its protagonist from childhood 
through to college. Here he explains the unique challenges of the shoot, why he is wary of nostalgia and why he believes that the process of filmmaking is more important than the end result. Interview by Ryan Gilbey.

Sinister cinema

No one would question the fact that appearances are critical to the way in which we experience and interpret movies. So is it really such a big step to suggest that even small, apparently insignificant, details – such as whether a character is left-handed – can affect how we read a film? By David Thomson.

The kill list

As action movies hit their stride in the 1980s, the biceps grew bigger as the body count rose. Then, in the 90s, the brute was remodelled and a more defined muscularity took hold, paving the way for today’s versatile crossover star – buff, tough and often just a little bit bland. By Nick Pinkerton.

Summer in the city

Twenty-five years on, Do the Right Thing, Spike Lee’s angry snapshot of racial tensions reaching boiling point in a New York City neighbourhood, still resonates. Ashley Clark considers the film’s enduring power, while key figures from the film world explain its hold on their imaginations.

When the lights went out

At the outset of the First World War, in an era before the birth of feature films and the star system, British cinemas prided themselves on offering a wildly eclectic mix of content – 
a diversity reflected in the BFI’s archive compilation A Night at the Cinema in 1914. By Pamela Hutchinson.

The fifth generation

The first directors to graduate from Beijing’s Film Academy after the repression of the Cultural Revolution had ended, China’s convention-busting New Wave blazed on to the world stage with films that shook up the old order of communist cinema. Michael Berry explores the evolution of the post-Mao generation, from the avant-garde spirit of early films such as The Horse Thief through to controversial epics like Farewell My Concubine and To Live, to the big-budget fantasies of Hero and House of Flying Daggers. Overleaf, Nick James and James Bell outline the key films.

 

Reviews

Films of the month

Grand Central
Jealousy
Norte, the End of History

plus reviews of

Arthur & Mike
Begin Again
Blackwood
Boyhood
Bright Days Ahead
Earth to Echo
Edge of Tomorrow
Finding Vivian Maier
The Galapagos Affair Satan Came to Eden
Here and Now
Hide Your Smiling Faces
The House of Magic
How to Train Your Dragon 2
How We Used to Live
I Am Divine
Jersey Boys
Jimmy’s Hall
Joe
Keeping Rosy
Love Me till Monday
Maleficent
A Million Ways to Die in the West
Mood Indig0
Mr Morgan’s Last Love
Northwest
The Nut Job
A Perfect Plan
Postman Pat  The Movie
A Promise
The Sacrament
Smart Ass
SuperMensch  The Legend of Shep Gordon
22 Jump Street
Under the Rainbow
Who Is Dayani Cristal?
The Year and the Vineyard

DVD features

Travelling light: Sullivan’s Travels

Preston Sturges takes a 
gloriously comic swipe at the pretensions and excesses of the movie business. By Kate Stables.

Revival

From hero to zero: Man of Marble

Andrzej Wajda’s tale of a decent man betrayed by the communist system reveals much about the society in which it was made. By Geoffrey Macnab.

Rediscovery

Hell on the El: The Incident

Martin Sheen makes his 
big-screen debut in an almost unbearably tense drama of cruelty and callousness. By Kim Newman.

plus reviews of

Bang! You’re Dead
Films by Leos Carax
Cry Danger
The Driver
Hobson’s Choice
If….
An Inspector Calls
The Max Linder Collection
The Pawnbroker
The Road to Glory
The Shadow of the Cat
Sleepaway Camp
Unfaithfully Yours

Features

COVER FEATURE: The S&S Interview – Richard Linklater

The acclaimed director of the Before trilogy discusses the genesis and evolution of his self-proclaimed ‘indie epic’ Boyhood, which was filmed over 12 years in order to capture the growing pains of its protagonist from childhood 
through to college. Here he explains the unique challenges of the shoot, why he is wary of nostalgia and why he believes that the process of filmmaking is more important than the end result. Interview by Ryan Gilbey.

Sinister cinema

No one would question the fact that appearances are critical to the way in which we experience and interpret movies. So is it really such a big step to suggest that even small, apparently insignificant, details – such as whether a character is left-handed – can affect how we read a film? By David Thomson.

The kill list

As action movies hit their stride in the 1980s, the biceps grew bigger as the body count rose. Then, in the 90s, the brute was remodelled and a more defined muscularity took hold, paving the way for today’s versatile crossover star – buff, tough and often just a little bit bland. By Nick Pinkerton.

Summer in the city

Twenty-five years on, Do the Right Thing, Spike Lee’s angry snapshot of racial tensions reaching boiling point in a New York City neighbourhood, still resonates. Ashley Clark considers the film’s enduring power, while key figures from the film world explain its hold on their imaginations.

When the lights went out

At the outset of the First World War, in an era before the birth of feature films and the star system, British cinemas prided themselves on offering a wildly eclectic mix of content – 
a diversity reflected in the BFI’s archive compilation A Night at the Cinema in 1914. By Pamela Hutchinson.

The fifth generation

The first directors to graduate from Beijing’s Film Academy after the repression of the Cultural Revolution had ended, China’s convention-busting New Wave blazed on to the world stage with films that shook up the old order of communist cinema. Michael Berry explores the evolution of the post-Mao generation, from the avant-garde spirit of early films such as The Horse Thief through to controversial epics like Farewell My Concubine and To Live, to the big-budget fantasies of Hero and House of Flying Daggers. Overleaf, Nick James and James Bell outline the key films.

 

Reviews

Films of the month

Grand Central
Jealousy
Norte, the End of History

plus reviews of

Arthur & Mike
Begin Again
Blackwood
Boyhood
Bright Days Ahead
Earth to Echo
Edge of Tomorrow
Finding Vivian Maier
The Galapagos Affair Satan Came to Eden
Here and Now
Hide Your Smiling Faces
The House of Magic
How to Train Your Dragon 2
How We Used to Live
I Am Divine
Jersey Boys
Jimmy’s Hall
Joe
Keeping Rosy
Love Me till Monday
Maleficent
A Million Ways to Die in the West
Mood Indig0
Mr Morgan’s Last Love
Northwest
The Nut Job
A Perfect Plan
Postman Pat  The Movie
A Promise
The Sacrament
Smart Ass
SuperMensch  The Legend of Shep Gordon
22 Jump Street
Under the Rainbow
Who Is Dayani Cristal?
The Year and the Vineyard

DVD features

Travelling light: Sullivan’s Travels

Preston Sturges takes a 
gloriously comic swipe at the pretensions and excesses of the movie business. By Kate Stables.

Revival

From hero to zero: Man of Marble

Andrzej Wajda’s tale of a decent man betrayed by the communist system reveals much about the society in which it was made. By Geoffrey Macnab.

Rediscovery

Hell on the El: The Incident

Martin Sheen makes his 
big-screen debut in an almost unbearably tense drama of cruelty and callousness. By Kim Newman.

plus reviews of

Bang! You’re Dead
Films by Leos Carax
Cry Danger
The Driver
Hobson’s Choice
If….
An Inspector Calls
The Max Linder Collection
The Pawnbroker
The Road to Glory
The Shadow of the Cat
Sleepaway Camp
Unfaithfully Yours

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Additional Info

SKU s&saug2014

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