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Sight & Sound September 2015 Sight & Sound September 2015

In our new Trash cinema special we talk to the ‘Pope of Trash’ himself, the great John Waters, about his life, films and influences, we survey the inglorious history of American Trash cinema and explore Britain’s own tradition of trashy and disreputable films.


Plus Andrew Haigh on his new film 45 Years, Aleksei German’s out of this world epic Hard to Be a God and the Italian cinema giant Vittorio De Sica

In our new Trash cinema special we talk to the ‘Pope of Trash’ himself, the great John Waters, about his life, films and influences, we survey the inglorious history of American Trash cinema and explore Britain’s own tradition of trashy and disreputable films.


Plus Andrew Haigh on his new film 45 Years, Aleksei German’s out of this world epic Hard to Be a God and the Italian cinema giant Vittorio De Sica

£4.50

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Features

Sight & Sound interview: John Waters

For almost half a century John Waters has provided a beacon for the maladjusted and misunderstood – and been a bête noire for puritans. But while the BFI’s forthcoming retrospective in London might seem to grant a veneer of later-life respectability to the pope of trash, don’t imagine he’s lost any of his mischievous ability to shock and offend. Interview by Kim Morgan

 

Total Trash

America’s taboo-busting trash classics offer a gleeful celebration of everything that might appal a mainstream audience. By Tim Lucas PLUS I.Q. Hunter on the naive energy of British cinema’s own cheap populism

 

First love, last rites

 In 45 Years, Andrew Haigh’s superb follow-up to Weekend, the ghosts of the past come back to haunt a long-married couple after the body of the husband’s former girlfriend is discovered in a melting glacier. Nick James talks to the director

 

Out of this world

Aleksei German’s apocalyptic vision of life on a distant planet, Hard to Be a God, took him almost 50 years to make and is the logical culmination of a brilliant career. By Michael Brooke

 

Vittorio De Sica: Beyond Neorealism

Vittorio De Sica’s reputation rests on classic tales of poverty and struggle in post-war Italy, such as Bicycle Thieves, but in a career that spanned more than 30 films as director and 150 as an actor, there is so much more that deserves our attention. By Pasquale Iannone

 

Reviews

Films of the month

Marshland
Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
Mistress America
The Wolfpack

plus reviews of

Ant-Man
Buttercup Bill
Cartel Land
Closed Curtain
The Cobbler
The Confessions of Thomas Quick
The Diary of a Teenage Girl
Dope
The Ecstasy of Wilko Johnson
52 Tuesdays
45 Years
The Gallows
Gemma Bovery
Good People
Hard to Be a God
Housebound
Looking for Love
Magic Mike XXL
Manglehorn
Max
No Escape
North v South
Paper Towns
Precinct Seven Five
President
Pressure
The Second Mother
Self/less
Southpaw
Strange Magic
Terminator Genisys
Theeb
Trainwreck
True Story

 

Features

Sight & Sound interview: John Waters

For almost half a century John Waters has provided a beacon for the maladjusted and misunderstood – and been a bête noire for puritans. But while the BFI’s forthcoming retrospective in London might seem to grant a veneer of later-life respectability to the pope of trash, don’t imagine he’s lost any of his mischievous ability to shock and offend. Interview by Kim Morgan

 

Total Trash

America’s taboo-busting trash classics offer a gleeful celebration of everything that might appal a mainstream audience. By Tim Lucas PLUS I.Q. Hunter on the naive energy of British cinema’s own cheap populism

 

First love, last rites

 In 45 Years, Andrew Haigh’s superb follow-up to Weekend, the ghosts of the past come back to haunt a long-married couple after the body of the husband’s former girlfriend is discovered in a melting glacier. Nick James talks to the director

 

Out of this world

Aleksei German’s apocalyptic vision of life on a distant planet, Hard to Be a God, took him almost 50 years to make and is the logical culmination of a brilliant career. By Michael Brooke

 

Vittorio De Sica: Beyond Neorealism

Vittorio De Sica’s reputation rests on classic tales of poverty and struggle in post-war Italy, such as Bicycle Thieves, but in a career that spanned more than 30 films as director and 150 as an actor, there is so much more that deserves our attention. By Pasquale Iannone

 

Reviews

Films of the month

Marshland
Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
Mistress America
The Wolfpack

plus reviews of

Ant-Man
Buttercup Bill
Cartel Land
Closed Curtain
The Cobbler
The Confessions of Thomas Quick
The Diary of a Teenage Girl
Dope
The Ecstasy of Wilko Johnson
52 Tuesdays
45 Years
The Gallows
Gemma Bovery
Good People
Hard to Be a God
Housebound
Looking for Love
Magic Mike XXL
Manglehorn
Max
No Escape
North v South
Paper Towns
Precinct Seven Five
President
Pressure
The Second Mother
Self/less
Southpaw
Strange Magic
Terminator Genisys
Theeb
Trainwreck
True Story

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Additional Info

SKU s&ssep2015

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