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John Cassavetes collection John Cassavetes collection

A selection of 6 John Cassavetes films A selection of 6 John Cassavetes films
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A selection of 6 John Cassavetes films, including:

Opening Night

Broadway actress Myrtle Gordon (Gena Rowlands) rehearses for her latest play about a woman in denial at the onset of her autumn years. When Myrtle witnesses the accidental death of an adoring young fan, it leads to a crisis of confidence in both her professional and her personal life which threatens to undermine the whole production.

Featuring a startling and compelling performance by Gena Rowlands, which won her the Silver Bear for Best Actress in 1978, Opening Night is arguably one of John Cassavetes' most self-reflexive works and offers an insightful and intriguing evocation of the theatrical experience from both side of the proscenium.

Faces

Chairman of the Board Richard (John Marley) and his wife Maria (Lynn Carlin) seek solace from their disintegrating marriage in the arms of other lovers in John Cassavetes' astonishingly powerful 1968 feature, Faces. Shooting in seering, high-contrast black and white 16mm, Cassavetes dissects the suffocating world of middle-class Los Angeles where hollow laughter and drunken frivolities mask loneliness and social alienation.

Nominated for three Oscars® - an unheard-of achievement for an independent film at the time - Faces employs a freewheeling, realistic approach, and showcases some of the finest performances ever seen in American cinema

A Woman Under the Influence

Arguably John Cassavetes most successful and influential film, A Woman Under the Influence stars Gena Rowlands (Gloria, Faces) and the legendary Peter Falk (Columbo) as Mabel and Nick Longhetti, a blue-collar worker couple struggling to cope with Mabel's slide into mental illness

Featuring a central performance of awe-inspiring conviction from Gena Rowlands, this critically acclaimed film is as powerful today as it was upon its original release, when it earned Oscar® nominations for Rowlands (Best Actress) and John Cassavates (Best Director).

Shadows

Set amongst the lively milieu of artists and jazz musicians in bohemian 1950s New York, John Cassavetes' directorial debut follows the doomed relationship between a young mixed-race woman Lelia (Lelia Goldoni) and Tony (Anthomy Ray), a white man who betrays his prejudice when he meets Lelia's brother, a struggling jazz singer.

Shot on location with a cast and crew largely made up of amateurs and featuring a swinging, improvised score by Charles Mingus and Shafi Hadi, Shadows gave birth to a radical new film language grounded in authenticity, and is widely considered the first truly independent American film.

The Killing of a Chinese Bookie

In an absorbing performance Ben Gazzara plays small-time Sunset Strip entrepreneur Cosmo Vittelli, owner of the Crazy Horse West night spot. An obsessive showman, Cosmo navigates a murky world of loan sharks and crooks to keep his club afloat, but when a gambling debt spirals out of control he is blackmailed into accepting a murderous commission.

Featuring stand-out turns by Seymour Cassel and Timothy Carey as the underworld racketeers out to fleece Cosmo, John Cassavetes' portrayal of one man's hubristic descent subverts the conventions of its genre to explore the darker side of the American dream.

Too Late Blues

The supreme master John Cassavetes followed up his earth-shaking 1959 debut Shadows with this, his first directorial effort for a major studio. Positioned somewhere between Cassavetes' ferocious independent productions and the Hollywood fare of the early 1960s, Too Late Blues represents a glimpse at a road not taken neither by the director himself, nor by mainstream American cinema in the era of the studio system's collapse - a parallel-universe of the movies that never came to pass... except in rare instances such as Too Late Blues

Legendary American singer Bobby Darin (of "Beyond the Sea" fame) plays the leader of a jazz band whose peripatetic performances ultimately lead him to cross paths with a singer (Stella Stevens, later of Jerry Lewis's The Nutty Professor) with whom he falls in love. Drama ensues when Darin's masculinity is thrown into question following a violent brawl, and the film lurches towards its gripping conclusion. 

The critic Jonathan Rosenbaum wrote that Cassavetes' film is a portrait of "the self-laceration and other forms of emotional brought about when a footloose jazz musician decides to sell out and go commercial, " that it "has moments that are indelible and heartbreaking, " and that "if you care a lot about Cassavetes, you should definitely see this. "

A selection of 6 John Cassavetes films, including:

Opening Night

Broadway actress Myrtle Gordon (Gena Rowlands) rehearses for her latest play about a woman in denial at the onset of her autumn years. When Myrtle witnesses the accidental death of an adoring young fan, it leads to a crisis of confidence in both her professional and her personal life which threatens to undermine the whole production.

Featuring a startling and compelling performance by Gena Rowlands, which won her the Silver Bear for Best Actress in 1978, Opening Night is arguably one of John Cassavetes' most self-reflexive works and offers an insightful and intriguing evocation of the theatrical experience from both side of the proscenium.

Faces

Chairman of the Board Richard (John Marley) and his wife Maria (Lynn Carlin) seek solace from their disintegrating marriage in the arms of other lovers in John Cassavetes' astonishingly powerful 1968 feature, Faces. Shooting in seering, high-contrast black and white 16mm, Cassavetes dissects the suffocating world of middle-class Los Angeles where hollow laughter and drunken frivolities mask loneliness and social alienation.

Nominated for three Oscars® - an unheard-of achievement for an independent film at the time - Faces employs a freewheeling, realistic approach, and showcases some of the finest performances ever seen in American cinema

A Woman Under the Influence

Arguably John Cassavetes most successful and influential film, A Woman Under the Influence stars Gena Rowlands (Gloria, Faces) and the legendary Peter Falk (Columbo) as Mabel and Nick Longhetti, a blue-collar worker couple struggling to cope with Mabel's slide into mental illness

Featuring a central performance of awe-inspiring conviction from Gena Rowlands, this critically acclaimed film is as powerful today as it was upon its original release, when it earned Oscar® nominations for Rowlands (Best Actress) and John Cassavates (Best Director).

Shadows

Set amongst the lively milieu of artists and jazz musicians in bohemian 1950s New York, John Cassavetes' directorial debut follows the doomed relationship between a young mixed-race woman Lelia (Lelia Goldoni) and Tony (Anthomy Ray), a white man who betrays his prejudice when he meets Lelia's brother, a struggling jazz singer.

Shot on location with a cast and crew largely made up of amateurs and featuring a swinging, improvised score by Charles Mingus and Shafi Hadi, Shadows gave birth to a radical new film language grounded in authenticity, and is widely considered the first truly independent American film.

The Killing of a Chinese Bookie

In an absorbing performance Ben Gazzara plays small-time Sunset Strip entrepreneur Cosmo Vittelli, owner of the Crazy Horse West night spot. An obsessive showman, Cosmo navigates a murky world of loan sharks and crooks to keep his club afloat, but when a gambling debt spirals out of control he is blackmailed into accepting a murderous commission.

Featuring stand-out turns by Seymour Cassel and Timothy Carey as the underworld racketeers out to fleece Cosmo, John Cassavetes' portrayal of one man's hubristic descent subverts the conventions of its genre to explore the darker side of the American dream.

Too Late Blues

The supreme master John Cassavetes followed up his earth-shaking 1959 debut Shadows with this, his first directorial effort for a major studio. Positioned somewhere between Cassavetes' ferocious independent productions and the Hollywood fare of the early 1960s, Too Late Blues represents a glimpse at a road not taken neither by the director himself, nor by mainstream American cinema in the era of the studio system's collapse - a parallel-universe of the movies that never came to pass... except in rare instances such as Too Late Blues

Legendary American singer Bobby Darin (of "Beyond the Sea" fame) plays the leader of a jazz band whose peripatetic performances ultimately lead him to cross paths with a singer (Stella Stevens, later of Jerry Lewis's The Nutty Professor) with whom he falls in love. Drama ensues when Darin's masculinity is thrown into question following a violent brawl, and the film lurches towards its gripping conclusion. 

The critic Jonathan Rosenbaum wrote that Cassavetes' film is a portrait of "the self-laceration and other forms of emotional brought about when a footloose jazz musician decides to sell out and go commercial, " that it "has moments that are indelible and heartbreaking, " and that "if you care a lot about Cassavetes, you should definitely see this. "

Additional Info

Additional Info

SKU JohnCassavetes
Format DVD, Blu-Ray
DVD region 2
Blu-ray region B

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