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Cinema in the Digital Age Cinema in the Digital Age

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By Nicholas Rombes By Nicholas Rombes
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Description: Have digital technologies transformed cinema into a new art, or do they simply replicate and mimic analogue, film-based cinema? Newly revised and expanded to take the latest developments into account, Cinema in the Digital Age examines the fate of cinema in the wake of the digital revolution. Nicholas Rombes considers Festen (1998), The Blair Witch Project (1999), Timecode (2000), Russian Ark (2002), and The Ring (2002), among others. Haunted by their analogue pasts, these films are interested not in digital purity but rather in imperfection and mistakes-blurry or pixilated images, shaky camera work, and other elements that remind viewers of the human behind the camera. With a new introduction and new material, this updated edition takes a fresh look at the historical and contemporary state of digital cinema. It pays special attention to the ways in which nostalgia for the look and feel of analogue disrupts the aesthetics of the digital image, as well as how recent films such as The Social Network (2010) and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011)-both shot digitally-have disguised and erased their digital foundations. The book also explores new possibilities for writing about and theorizing film, such as randomization.

Review: The rise of digital has changed not only the ways films are made, but the ways they are watched, thought, and dreamed about. In this revised edition of his groundbreaking Cinema in the Digital Age, Nicholas Rombes thrillingly identifies the essential films, technologies and practices emblematizing the rupture of digital before peering, with both anxiety and excitement, into the pixel-smeared wilderness ahead.--Scott Macaulay, editor-in-chief, Filmmaker Magazine; producer, Forensic Films Nicholas Rombes' updated version of Cinema in the Digital Age is a playful and provocative work. His book offers a compelling and creative approach to film criticism grounded in the material aspects of digital media as it becomes our everyday mode for making, distributing, watching, and sharing movies.--Chuck Tryon, Fayetteville State University Over the last several decades, digital technologies have profoundly changed the ways that movies are made, as well as the ways that we watch them. But these changes are neither simple nor straightforward. In Cinema in the Digital Age, Nicholas Rombes surveys these changes with a kaleidoscopic collage of observations, suggestions, and extrapolations.--Steven Shaviro, DeRoy Professor of English, Wayne State University

Contents: Acknowledgments Preface to the Revised Edition Preface 1. Accelerationism 2. The Adorno Paradox 3. Against Method 4. Analog/Digital Splice 5. Blood, Simple 6. Boredom and Analog Nostalgia 7. The Digital Spectacular 8. Disposable Aesthetics 9. DV Humanism 10. Filmless Films 11. Frame Dragging 12. The Ideology of the Long Take 13. Image/Text 14. Incompleteness 15. Interfaces 16. iPod Experiment 17. Ironic Mode 18. Looking at Yourself Looking: Avatar as Spectator 19. The Lost Underground 20. Love in the Time of Fragments 21. Media as Its Own Theory 22. Mobile Viewing 23. Moving Space in the Frame, and a Note on Film Theory 24. Natural Time 25. Nonlinear 26. Paranormal Activity 2 27. Pausing 28. Punk 29. Realism 30. Real Time 31. The Real You 32. The Reality Industrial Complex 33. Remainders 34. Sampling 35. Secondary Becomes Primary 36. Self-Deconstructing Narratives 37. Shaky Camera 38. Shoot! 39. Simultaneous Cinema 40. Small Screens 41. Target Video 42. Time, Memory 43. Time-Shifting 44. Timesis: Skimming and Skipping 45. Undirected Films 46. Viewer Participation 47. Virtual Humanism: Part 1 48. Virtual Humanism: Part 2 49. Visible Language, Spring 1977 50. Interpreting Film Images Through Randomized Constraint: The Blue Velvet Project Filmography Bibliography

Author Biography: Nicholas Rombes is professor of English at the University of Detroit Mercy. He is the author of several books on cinema and punk, including The Ramones (2005), and editor of New Punk Cinema (2005). He also directed the feature-length lo-fi paranoid thriller The Removals (2016).

Description: Have digital technologies transformed cinema into a new art, or do they simply replicate and mimic analogue, film-based cinema? Newly revised and expanded to take the latest developments into account, Cinema in the Digital Age examines the fate of cinema in the wake of the digital revolution. Nicholas Rombes considers Festen (1998), The Blair Witch Project (1999), Timecode (2000), Russian Ark (2002), and The Ring (2002), among others. Haunted by their analogue pasts, these films are interested not in digital purity but rather in imperfection and mistakes-blurry or pixilated images, shaky camera work, and other elements that remind viewers of the human behind the camera. With a new introduction and new material, this updated edition takes a fresh look at the historical and contemporary state of digital cinema. It pays special attention to the ways in which nostalgia for the look and feel of analogue disrupts the aesthetics of the digital image, as well as how recent films such as The Social Network (2010) and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011)-both shot digitally-have disguised and erased their digital foundations. The book also explores new possibilities for writing about and theorizing film, such as randomization.

Review: The rise of digital has changed not only the ways films are made, but the ways they are watched, thought, and dreamed about. In this revised edition of his groundbreaking Cinema in the Digital Age, Nicholas Rombes thrillingly identifies the essential films, technologies and practices emblematizing the rupture of digital before peering, with both anxiety and excitement, into the pixel-smeared wilderness ahead.--Scott Macaulay, editor-in-chief, Filmmaker Magazine; producer, Forensic Films Nicholas Rombes' updated version of Cinema in the Digital Age is a playful and provocative work. His book offers a compelling and creative approach to film criticism grounded in the material aspects of digital media as it becomes our everyday mode for making, distributing, watching, and sharing movies.--Chuck Tryon, Fayetteville State University Over the last several decades, digital technologies have profoundly changed the ways that movies are made, as well as the ways that we watch them. But these changes are neither simple nor straightforward. In Cinema in the Digital Age, Nicholas Rombes surveys these changes with a kaleidoscopic collage of observations, suggestions, and extrapolations.--Steven Shaviro, DeRoy Professor of English, Wayne State University

Contents: Acknowledgments Preface to the Revised Edition Preface 1. Accelerationism 2. The Adorno Paradox 3. Against Method 4. Analog/Digital Splice 5. Blood, Simple 6. Boredom and Analog Nostalgia 7. The Digital Spectacular 8. Disposable Aesthetics 9. DV Humanism 10. Filmless Films 11. Frame Dragging 12. The Ideology of the Long Take 13. Image/Text 14. Incompleteness 15. Interfaces 16. iPod Experiment 17. Ironic Mode 18. Looking at Yourself Looking: Avatar as Spectator 19. The Lost Underground 20. Love in the Time of Fragments 21. Media as Its Own Theory 22. Mobile Viewing 23. Moving Space in the Frame, and a Note on Film Theory 24. Natural Time 25. Nonlinear 26. Paranormal Activity 2 27. Pausing 28. Punk 29. Realism 30. Real Time 31. The Real You 32. The Reality Industrial Complex 33. Remainders 34. Sampling 35. Secondary Becomes Primary 36. Self-Deconstructing Narratives 37. Shaky Camera 38. Shoot! 39. Simultaneous Cinema 40. Small Screens 41. Target Video 42. Time, Memory 43. Time-Shifting 44. Timesis: Skimming and Skipping 45. Undirected Films 46. Viewer Participation 47. Virtual Humanism: Part 1 48. Virtual Humanism: Part 2 49. Visible Language, Spring 1977 50. Interpreting Film Images Through Randomized Constraint: The Blue Velvet Project Filmography Bibliography

Author Biography: Nicholas Rombes is professor of English at the University of Detroit Mercy. He is the author of several books on cinema and punk, including The Ramones (2005), and editor of New Punk Cinema (2005). He also directed the feature-length lo-fi paranoid thriller The Removals (2016).

Additional Info

Additional Info

SKU 9780231167550
Author(s) Rombes, Nicholas
Publisher(s) Columbia University Press
Format Paperback
Original publication date 9 Jan 2018
Edition revised edition
Number of pages 280

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